Lively Don Quixote Ballet Leaps onto the Parisian Scene

Lively Don Quixote Ballet Leaps onto the Parisian Scene

Don Quixote is a classic work of literature that has been reinterpreted in both theater, music and dance. One of the most popular interpretations is the ballet version of Don Quixote, especially in France, where this work is known as 'Don Quichotte.' Created in 1869 by Marius Petipa, this ballet has been performed time and time again. So much so, that the Opéra de Paris decided to put a whole new spin on the traditional performance. Conceived by Rudolf Noureev at the Opéra de Paris in 1981, when he was at the head of this opera performance institution, the newer version of the Don Quichotte ballet is brighter and livelier. Noureev's re-envisioning of Don Quichotte was met with success when it was integrated into the official repertory of the Opéra de Paris. In addition to livelier choreography, the latest version of the ballet -- which will be performed this year at the Opéra Bastille from November 16, 2012 until December 31, 2012 --  is also invigorated by its choice of costumes. Recently redesigned by Alexandre Beliaev and Elena Rivkina in 2002, these costumes are directly inspired by paintings by Aragonese artist Francisco Goya, in order to emphasize the Spanish origins of the source material. Guests staying at one of the Grands Hôtels Parisiens now have the chance to enjoy a performance of this ballet during their visit. Tickets range from 5 euros to 92 euros, depending on seat placement, and can be purchased on the website of the Opéra Bastille. Visitors should also note that there will be a special New Year's Eve performance on December 31 at 7:30 p.m., enabling spectators to begin their nights with a rousing show before ringing in the new year. Seeing Don Quichotte at the Opéra Bastille will no doubt make any night a little more special.