Illustrator Gustave Doré Brings Imagination to Life

Illustrator Gustave Doré Brings Imagination to Life
Gustave Doré was a French artist active in the mid- and late 19th century. Although most of his work was done with wood engravings, his talents also enabled him to create spectacular paintings, watercolors and sculptures. He is perhaps most famous for his book illustrations, having illustrated works by Lord Byron, Edgar Allan Poe, John Milton, Cervantes and Tennyson.

In February 2014, the Musée d'Orsay will pay tribute to this accomplished artist and illustrator in an exhibition entitled 'Gustave Doré, L'imaginaire au pouvoir' ('Gustave Doré, the Power of the Imagination'). This exhibit traces the history of Doré, whose career began at the tender age of 15 when he became a caricaturist. His evolution to book illustration subsequently skyrocketed him to worldwide renown. After that, he began experimenting with other forms of art.

Guests staying at one of the Grands Hôtels Parisiens can discover the versatility of Doré — a versatility that goes beyond the book illustrations for which he is famous. Nestled in the center of Paris, the Musée d'Orsay is very easily accessible from any of the Grands Hôtels locations. Those who decide to check out the exhibit can see Doré's giant canvas works, lively watercolors and his mastery of washes along with the drawings and engravings for which he is traditionally known.

In this way, visitors can explore the artistic vision of a historical figure who has inspired some of the most creative minds of the art world, and still does even today. In fact, many would argue that his works have had an irrefutable impact on the evolution of the comic book. For this reason, 'Gustave Doré, the Power of the Imagination' — which runs from February 18 to May 11, 2014 — provides a unique opportunity for anyone interested in art or modern culture.